When I was young I had to walk two miles to school, uphill, both ways,in the snow, and potatoes in my pockets to keep my hands warm , which I had to eat for my lunch


 

I have been very lucky in my job to work with students. There is nothing I enjoy more than having Music Therapy interns and practica students work with us. I enjoy the mentoring process and we learn a lot from them! Plus, I always say that for a forgetful person like me, they’re good to have around because they never forget to carry paper, pens and guitar picks! In addition to that, I have employees, classmates, friends and babysitters in my life who are all of this younger generation as well. Lately I’ve been taking personnel management courses and learning about the “generation Y” employee and how we as supervisors need to modify our managerial style to compensate for this new brand of employee. I’ve also heard a lot from veteran managers about why do we have to be the ones to change, shouldn’t the employee be expected to perform in the same way as every other employee? I asked this question in a personnel course and the answer was no. In theory, every employee is an individual, it just so happens that this new generation of employee seems to require more attention!

If you’ve made it this far, you could be wondering what this has to do with the price of tea in China…well it’s like this, when I was growing up, it was kind of a joke in our house that my stepdad would tell us how hard things were when he was growing up and how he had to walk two miles to school every day. To that we’d add “in the snow” and “uphill both ways!” it’s a typical parent thing to remind your children how hard you had it. Well, I have recently realized that I am becoming my parents…yes, I’m now at an age that I have found myself making similar statements! Yes, I have found myself making statements lately and realize that I sound like my parents. “When I was in school we didn’t even have cell phones! We had to use a pay phone!” “When I was in college, we didn’t have air conditioning in our dorms and we had to use fans to circulate the air and we sweated!” “when I was in school, we didn’t have the Internet, we had to go to the library!” get the picture?

This is what I’ve become. The living embodiment of my parents….and it scares the hell out of me. It wasn’t long ago that I just didn’t think they could possibly understand what I was going through, and how could they think my choice of music was crap? It was genius! Certainly better than that Justin Beiber, or those rap guys (do they call it rap anymore, I think it’s hip hop now). But that’s another topic for another day. Ah yes…the evolution of music, or what was it they’re always screaming about?

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Anne
    Jul 20, 2011 @ 16:26:08

    The funny thing is that if you throw “when i was in college we didn’t have internet, tivo, cell phones, or ipods” they probably would think we had it really rough 🙂

    But, wow, researching anything is so much easier now – about 6 years ago my parents moved and dropped off the contents of the attic at my house, with the statement of “this is your stuff, you can deal with it now.”
    I realized that back then, if we read an interesting article or wanted to save magazines for reference, we had to cut it out and save it. Let’s just say that I filled half a dumpster with all of that stuff. about 3 years of The Economist too….I wrote a lot of papers using that magazine.
    It’s not quite the same as flipping through the pages, but I’m happy now I can just buy decades of National Geographic on DVD!

    Reply

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